Current Products

Twenty Limited Edition 00 gauge model railway wagons are currently available, including variations. All models are based on original research and come complete with a Limited Edition certificate. They are compatible with other 00 gauge rolling stock produced by Hornby, Bachmann and others. Models have weighted finely moulded plastic bodies, run on spoked metal wheels and are fitted with detachable tension lock couplings (all the current wagons have slim-line couplings in standard NEM pockets). Each wagon is boxed separately with a clear plastic insert ensuring easy viewing and safe handling. These are ready-to-run models and are ideal for operating or for display purposes. Each is an authentic model and a collectable item.

Authenticity: We sell ‘history on wheels’. With our Industrial History backgrounds, we always strive to make the appearance of our model wagons match the original photographs or drawings as closely as possible. We try not to simplify designs. All our wagons are ‘Authentic’ unless we specifically declare them a 'Variation on Authenticor ‘tailored, based on other historic evidence’. Feedback is always welcome, as are further details about wagons past and present, and ideas for future

*** THE CORNWALL COLLECTION ***

After some protracted research, we have brought together a special collection of wagons from the china clay and mineral industries of Cornwall to celebrate the enterprise and endeavour of Cornish miners and engineers. These wagons each represent genuine companies who operated privately-owner wagons in Cornwall. The liveries and colours are as accurate as the records allow.

We are pleased to offer all these wagons with a genuine  load of either China Clay, Chinastone, or stone material from the correct quarry, supplied by ATTWOOD AGGREGATES

 

No.387 West of England Chinastone & Clay Company. St Austell
5-plank wagon with genuine chinastone load, No.43.

Dark Grey body, white lettering, fine red shadow (early livery)
Suitable:
GWR, other Cornish lines, private ChinaClay sidings

Authentic  

Chinastone is a medium grained, feldspar-rich partially kaolinised granite characterised by the absence of iron-bearing minerals. Its discovery in the mid-18th century was a crucial event in the development of the English porcelain industry. It is often used as a flux with much softer China Clays when making porcelain, and coatings for paper. West of England Chinastone & Clay Company eventually become part of English China Clays (ECC) in 1919, taken over by the French business, Imerys in 1999. From a photo.

£13.50 each

No.402 Parkyn & Peters t/a Burngallow China Clay & Stone Works. 5-plank wagon on 9’ wheelbase No.40 with genuine chinastone load

Dark red body, white lettering, shaded black, dark grey end irons.   
Suitable:GWR, other Cornish lines, private ChinaClay sidings

Authentic  

Parkyn & Peters of Burngallow purchased 10 wagons from Charles Roberts of Wakefield in 1930, through the finance broker, North Central Wagon Co. The wagons were painted ruby red with white lettering and recorded as ‘empty to Burngallow’ and ‘Repairs; advise N C Wagon Co. St Blazey’. From a photo.  

£13.50 each

 

No.403 North and Rose China Clay Co., St Austell, Cornwall. 5-plank wagon on 9’ wheelbase No.18 with genuine china clay load

Grey body, white lettering, dark grey detail, shaded red.   
Suitable:GWR, other Cornish lines, private ChinaClay sidings

Authentic  

North & Rose China Clay Co. operated a number of modest China Clay quarries close to Drinnick, northwest of St Austell. Like other local operators their business focussed on both china clay and chinastone. The former was a vital ingredient in papermaking, the latter a key component in porcelain and the wider ceramics industry. From a photo.   

£13.50 each

 

No.404 Burthay Clay Works, St Austell, Cornwall. 5-plank wagon on 9’ wheelbase No.18 with genuine china clay load

Red oxide body, white lettering, dark grey end irons.   
Suitable:GWR, other Cornish lines, private ChinaClay sidings

Authentic  

The Burthay China Clay, Tin & Granite Works Co. purchased 20 wagons from the Bute Works Supply Co. of Cardiff in 1906, financed by the North Central Wagon Co. They were numbered 1-20 and painted up as this example. The business extracted china clay, iron and minerals from several small quarries around St Austell and to the west, near Grampound Road. The proprietor, Richard Parsons, is recorded as a china clay producer, merchant, and exporter, with offices in St Austell. From a written description.   

£13.50 each

 

No.405 St Neot China Clay Company Ltd, Liskeard. 5-plank wagon on 9’ wheelbase No.12 with genuine stone load

Brown body, white lettering, grey detail, dark grey end irons.   
Suitable:GWR, other Cornish lines, private ChinaClay sidings

Authentic  

In 1904 the St Neot China Clay Co. of Liskeard bought 20 wagons from wagon builder Charles Roberts of Wakefield, numbered 1-20. They were painted ‘chocolate’ with white lettering, with ‘return to Moorswater’ on the GWR Liskeard-Looe branch. Apparently the new wagons were delivered to the west country via either Carlton Main Colliery or Curdworth and Hemsworth Colliery, near Wakefield, loading coal for Purnell & Co. of Exeter. From a written description.   

£13.50 each

 

No.406 The Goonvean China Clay & Stone Co. Ltd, St Austell, Cornwall. 5-plank wagon on 9’ wheelbase No.V16 with genuine stone load

Bauxite body, white lettering, shaded black. Dark grey end irons.   
Suitable:GWR, other Cornish lines, private ChinaClay sidings

Authentic  

The Goonvean China Clay & Stone Co. of St Austell purchased 20 new wagons from the Cambrian Wagon Co. in 1928. The business was one of the few China Clay operators to remain independent through into the 21st century. However the quarrying and extraction parts of the business were sold to the industry giant Imerys in 2012. From a photo.

£13.50 each

 

No.407 Goonbarrow China Clay Works Co., Fowey. 5-plank wagon on 9’ wheelbase No.24 with genuine stone load

Dark grey body, white lettering, shaded red. Black end irons.   
Suitable:GWR, other Cornish lines, private ChinaClay sidings

Authentic  

The West Goonbarrow China Clay Works were located just west of Bugle in Cornwall. As the nearby Goonbarrow pit expanded in the early 20th century it encompassed a number of smaller china clay workings including: Old Bean Clay works, Imperial Goonbarrow, East Goonbarrow, Candledown, Cleaves, South Candledown, and Rock Hill clay works. The huge site is now abandoned. From a photo.

£13.50 each

 

No.408 Betty & Tom Ltd of Menheniot near Liskeard, Cornwall. 5-plank wagon on 9’ wheelbase No.2659 with genuine Cornish basalt [Blue Elvin] mineral load

Dark red body, white lettering, shaded black.   
Suitable:GWR, other Cornish lines

Authentic  

In the first half of the 20th century, Betty & Tom operated a lead mine close to Menheniot, almost certainly the Clicker Tor Quarry adjacent to the GWR mainline at Menheniot station. The lead ore was known as Galena and had some traces of silver, arsenic and many other minerals. Sidings from the GWR main line at Menheniot were laid in 1930.  The business diversified into the large scale production of railway ballast and concrete blocks. From a photo.

£13.50 each

 

No.409 Par Harbour Co. 5-plank wagon on 9’ wheelbase, No.22 with genuine stone load

dark grey body, white lettering, shaded red.   
Suitable: GWR, other Cornish lines, private ChinaClay sidings

Authentic  

Joseph Treffry owned the Fowey Consol mines and wanted a harbour to export copper and import coal. Between 1829 and 1840 he built Par Docks. In early years substantial quantities of Cornish granite were shipped. Later in the 19th century it became a focal point for the export of china clay. The Treffry estate sold the whole operation to English China Clay (ECC) in 1964. From a photo.

£13.50 each

 

No.375. G Small & Son, Coal Merchants & General Agent, of Taunton, Tiverton, Thorne[falcon], et al, MR-style vent van. No.44

Light grey body, White lettering, black details.
S
uitable: GWR, LSWR, SR, others

Variation on Authentic; based on open wagon

Born in 1850, the son of a stonemason, George Small started work as a ‘mason’s boy’ in 1861, implying he had a limited education! By 1890 he ran his own building enterprise, later buying a coal business - unusual for a builder. Described as a Coal and Corn merchant in 1901, Kelly’s lists two depots in Taunton and ten in local villages. Between 1892 and 1911, Small & Co. bought over 40 new wagons, a substantial fleet for the time.

Low stock

£13.00 each

 

No.373. W.E. Turner, Coal Merchant, of Chard, 5-plank, 9' wheelbase wagon, No.11

Medium grey body, White lettering, shaded black.
S
uitable: B&E Rly, GWR, LSWR, others

Authentic

William Turner moved to Chard in the 1840’s and dealt in corn, seed and coal, with premises at Fulham Wharf (Chard Canal) and Fore Street, Chard. With the opening of the two branch lines to Chard (GWR from Taunton, LSWR from Chard Junction) in 1866, his son, Edward Turner, developed the railway-based business. Subsequently his eldest son established the firm as William Edward Turner & Co. Evidence suggests  W.E. Turner had at least four wagons. From a photo.

£13.00 each

 

No.397 Royal Navy Dockyards, Senior Naval Stores Officer (S.N.S.O.), rectangular tank wagon No.467

Dark Navy Blue, white lettering.   
Suitable: Military Dockyard railways, perhaps others

Variation based on open wagon examples

Within each Royal Navy Dockyard, the Senior Naval Stores Officer (S.N.S.O.) was responsible for most of the non-armament stores for use within the Dockyard and for supplies to the ships based there. The Portsmouth Royal Dockyard and the Devonport Dockyard both had extensive internal railway networks, and both were linked to the national railway system. This wagon is based on open wagon examples; the running number reflects an un-attributed allocation at Devonport, although it is suitable for the Royal Dockyard at Portsmouth and other RN dockyard locations.

Last few; less than 5 wagons remaining

£15.00 each

 

No.357 D.R.Llewellyn, Merrett & Price (London) Ltd, Coal Factors of London and Southampton, 8-plank wagon No.A4520

Black body, white lettering.   
Suitable: GWR, LSWR, SR, LMS, other railways across Southern England and in South Wales

Authentic  

This business was established in the 1890's, combining the assets of, amoungst others, D.R.Llewellyn & Sons Ltd. and H.H.Merrett, t/a Merrett Brothers of Cardiff. Sir David Llewellyn, Bt., was a major colliery owner and a substantial shareholder of GKN (originally Guest, Keen & Nettlefolds of Heath Green, Birmingham, but later becoming a major investor in the South Wales coal industry). They traded as Colliery Agents, Coal Factors, and Ship Owners with several dozen vessels. In 1927 they joined L.Gueret & Co. to become pioneers of a co-operative selling system for all South Wales coal producers. Gueret, Llewellyn & Price Ltd traded through into the 1950's. From a photo.   

£13.00 each

 

No.396 United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO), MR-style Vent Van No.1

Charcoal black Body with cream roof, white lettering, motif on door.   
Suitable: GWR, Military Dockyard Railways, probably all other railways

Tailored based on historic documents

The United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO) was established in 1795 to produce nautical charts for the Royal Navy, at a time when more vessels were lost to poor navigation than to enemy action. Initially based at the Admiralty offices in central London, printing operations eventually moved to Cricklewood and cartographic work transferred to Feltham. The printing operations relocated to Taunton in 1938, in the build-up to WWII. The purpose-built factory (which still has traces of wartime camouflage) included a long loading bay designed to accommodate a potential siding from the nearby GWR main line, although the connection was never constructed. The remaining cartographic work centralised to Taunton in 1968. Today UKHO is the world’s largest producer of official paper and electronic charts; over 90% of international shipping uses UKHO products.

£15.00 each

 

384. E. Baily & Son Ltd. of Frome, Southampton, Bristol, et al, Maltsters, Bulk Grain Hopper No.18

Black body, white lettering, light grey roof
Suitable: SR, GWR, S&DJR, others

Variation on Authentic; original was open wagon

E Baily & Son were maltsters, based at Frome, with private sidings to the Station Maltings. They had other substantial maltings across the West Country, including Southampton (in the Western Docks), Warminster, Portishead and Avonmouth. This wagon could have been used for inbound grain from west country ports, or maybe for delivering malted grain to the many large breweries in the region

£15.00 each

 

385. G.W. Loco Department, Rectangular drinking water tanker No.26

off-white body, maroon lettering
Suitable: GWR, maybe others

Authentic

G.W. Camp Coaches were often positioned on remote, un-serviced sidings. The sister to this tank wagon was photographed with a Camp Coach at Powerstock, on the Bridport Branch in Dorset, in 1938. With no mains water supply, the tank wagon provided water for all purposes, although another source suggests water for drinking for the station and the residents came in daily in churns by passenger tran from Maiden Newton. Other Camp Coaches are know to have been serviced by dedicated 6-wheel water tankers based on the ubiquitous G.W 6-wheel milk tankers. All such examples of both tankers were assigned to the Loco Department, as they were also used for locomotive operations. From a photo.

£15.00 each

 

No.381      Herbert Rigler of Bournemouth Central, Coal Merchant, 5-plank wagon on 9’ wheelbase wagon with coal load, No.106

Bright red body, white lettering shaded black.   
Suitable: LSWR, SR, S&DJR, probably GWR, others

Authentic

Herbert Rigler senior established himself in 1879, possibly aged 14, as a coal, coke and firewood, corn, hay and straw merchant and contractor. He soon had premises at 136 (later re-numbered as 358) Wimborne Road, Winton. His eldest son, Herbert Thomas Rigler, emigrated to Australia in 1908 , after family arguments, and was subsequently killed on the Somme in 1916. His younger brother, Alfred Rigler, took over the business in 1924, which soon amalgamated with (was taken over by?) Bradford & Sons Ltd, Coal Factors of Yeovil. From a photo.  

£13.00 each

 

No.386 W.Jewell of Exeter.
5-plank wagon with coal load on 9’ wheelbase, No.2

Chocolate Brown body, white lettering shaded black,
Suitable:
GWR, LSWR, SR, others

Authentic 

William Jewell entered the coal trade with seemingly no previous connection to the industry. Born in Dawlish in 1873 he worked as a lath renderer and mason’s labourer before changing occupation. By 1904 he was trading in coal from Queen Street Station, Exeter (today Exeter Central). He purchased two 8-ton wagons from Gloucester RC&WCo., both registered by the GWR. In 1911 William was living with his family in Tudor Street, Exeter, described as a coal merchant and employer. In that year he renewed the repair contracts on both wagons for a further 7 years. William may have died in 1914. The business subsequently appears to have been sold, possibly to a larger Exeter merchant such as Varwell Guest & Co. who may have helped him previously. From a photo.

£13.00 each

 

No.410 J Arkell & Sons Ltd, Arkell's Kingsdown Brewery, Swindon, MR-style vent van, No.16.

Dark Green body, gold lettering, fine red shadow
Suitable:
GWR, S&DJR, M&SWJR, maybe others

Tailored based on historic documents

John Arkell started brewing in 1843, using barley from his own farm at Stratton St.Margaret, near Swindon. Fortuitously, this coincided with the rapid growth of Swindon, spurred by the building of the great GWR works. He built a new steam brewery in 1861, and by 1900 owned around a quarter of all the pubs in Swindon. Arkell’s remains a family business today, supporting over 110 owned pubs 

£15.00 each

 

No.351. Robert Lush & Son of Tisbury, 7-plank wagon on 9' wheelbase, with coal load, No.3.

Red Oxide body, black and cream lettering,
Suitable:
L&SWR, SR, S&DJR, GW ,

Authentic  

Robert Lush was the local coal merchant at Tisbury in the later 19th Century, through until at least the 1930s. Tisbury is a modest rural station in South Wiltshire, built by the Salisbury & Yeovil Railway Co.. It opened in May 1859, with the main line being doubled in 1863. It included a goods yard with a refuge siding, two goods sidings and a loading bank on the up side, and a refuge siding and a coal siding serving three staiths, on the down side. This wagon was photographed, in company of several Ford Model T pick-ups, c.1925.

£13.00 each

 

Earlier wagons

Our Limited Edition wagons are exactly that: they are available for a limited period and when they are all sold, they cease to be available!

However, we do very occasionally have access to individual wagons which were previously 'sold out', perhaps when a regular customer has asked us to help them as they 'thin' their collection; we no longer keep a waiting list for specific wagons, instead when any are available they will be noted in Red on the HISTORY page with their prices.

There are a number of earlier wagons, plus a few similar wagons produced by other Limited Edition specialists, available today (28th October 2021): they are listed on the HISTORY pages with their prices.

 

releases.

 

 


Click here to return to the top of this page